The iTunes 11 iBooks Mystery

iTunes 11 to get visual revamp, beefier iCloud ties?

https://twitter.com/#!/mikecane/status/97117358388285442

https://twitter.com/#!/mikecane/status/97117782088499201

Eventually Apple will lock down iTunes so that only Apple-purchased and Apple-related material will work with iTunes.

I fully expect syncing of non-iBooks eBooks to be prevented one day.

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18 Comments

Filed under Apple: The Company, eBooks: General

18 responses to “The iTunes 11 iBooks Mystery

  1. “Eventually Apple will lock down iTunes”…
    Just like they’ve locked-down iTunes so I can no longer rip a CD — Oooops, guess they haven’t.
    ———-
    Sounds like you’re stating a fact rather than just an opinion.

    • mikecane

      Is iTunes 11 out yet? Wake the fuck up, fanboy.

      • No, so you can’t make a statement inferring fact either — It has nothing to do with fanboyism, just speculation vs fact – You’re the one that needs to wake the fuck up Mike

      • mikecane

        Be sure to come back here when it’s been all locked down. Or will you use the upcoming “iCloud Defense” I’ve been getting? Goes like this: “Ohhhhh, that doesn’t matter now that there’s iCloud.” Bullshit.

    • Ravi

      This CD ripping you speak of, doesn’t it require some obscure piece of equipment called an optical drive? What percentage of new Macs come with optical drives these days? How does that compare to a year ago? How will that compare to a year from now?

      There’s more than one way to skin a cat.

      • mikecane

        Doing a Comment 4x isn’t going to get me to check the Spam filter any faster.

        Typical myopia of an Apple fanboy. You forget that iTunes runs on Windows these days too.

  2. Eldon

    Nice bait. And very professional to treat your readers with the above comments…

    • mikecane

      Snark gets slapped down. Now you piss off, snark defender.

      • Eldon

        LOL. I think you can piss off. You are hardly interesting to have people come back for more. Being rude only works when you have some talent. I never read your blog before, I highly doubt I will again. Cheers mate.

      • mikecane

        And yet you came back. Liar.

  3. fdesmond3

    What a sorry blog post! You post speculation to get search spiders, such as macsurfer (the link I followed), to bring traffic to your site. Then you are obscenely rude to your visitors. You should be ashamed!

    • mikecane

      First of all, poor-brain, MacSurfer’s link was submitted to them, not crawled. Second, I’ve had crybabies like you wail about my speculations before, which turned out to be correct, but you never come back to apologize for your own rudeness and thick stupidity. Third, fuck off.

  4. The current iBook reader supports ePub and pdf. ePub is an open standard.

    You can make your own and read them on the iBook. How do you get them there? Lots of ways – and one is via iTunes. Which by my logic would extend iTunes usefulness and forward the ePub standard if iTunes would actually let you read the books as well as sync them.

    I don’t follow your logic at all.

  5. Shock Me

    Does iTunes synch these other types of eBooks today? If so, does it support syncing the associated reader hardware? If so, we might see some precedent in the collapsing support of iTunes for non-Apple media players.

    Being a fan of the iBooks app and simplicity, I’d prefer to have all titles available on it as soon as possible. Ideally, there would be a document de jure standard shared by all readers like ePub. Something as powerful as the de facto document standard from Microsoft like .doc. Additionally, a common DRM standard to protect copyrighted works would be nice too.

    Given the need for differentiation by hardware makers and the market power of Amazon, both of these goals appear to be extremely unlikely. Although I have very little need for reading books on a computer monitor, I can see where it might have some use for electronic textbooks when preparing notes for coursework and in producing term papers and research documents.

    As far as Apple supporting standard features from other readers like no-charge back-ups in the iCloud, that seems a given. The question of whether they would bear the cost for providing that service for eBooks not from their own store seems reasonable.

    If something that drastic were to occur it would only be sustainable if they provided an alternative source of content as deep as their combined competitors. Even then, the most likely response will be exclusive deals made with popular authors to drive users to and fro.

    Oh well, glad my library of printed books doesn’t require batteries or DRM. At least I’ll have something to read as long as the sun and my spectacles survive.

    • mikecane

      When Apple introduced iBooks, people could take DRM-free ePubs and drag and drop them into iTunes to move over to their iDevice. This is the capability I see going away. Some people have said this doesn’t matter. That’s bullshit. Carina Press and Baen Books are two sellers of DRM-free ePubs. Also, some people will strip the DRM off their property (purchased ebooks) and choose to transfer them.

      Let’s see if this move, linked below, also presages the end of burning to CDs:
      https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2566252?start=0&tstart=0

  6. snowbag

    The “burn button” issue is part of Apple’s long slow move away from the burned media ecosystem: see the new mini for the latest step. But they didn’t take away the functionality.

    But per iBooks: wouldn’t video be a better analogy? iTunes accepts all my ripped video and transfers the files to my iDevice (assuming I know my codecs and presets). But it never denies a file based on _where_it is from, and I suspect Apple makes a lot more money off of the iTunes film and tv store than the iBookstore.

    I do see your point about the app syncing via iTunes. But Goodreader and other apps signal that syncing probably needs to continue. There are quite a few podcast apps that also parallel/surpass iTunes’s functioning, and I think use a similar sync model. iCloud might actually open up syncing access rather than limit everything to and through that 30-pin pipe between your iDevice and iTunes.

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