Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes: Final Edition

China’s National Day holiday continues to keep things quiet at the tech sites I check daily.

In the forums, the Onda V819 Mini continues to get lots of astroturf action [Google English]. It’s like AnTuTu 4.0 and AnTuTu X were never released:

OndaV819MiniFraudScore

That’s clearly fraudulent. AnTuTu X puts it in the 12,000 range.

What’s interesting about all of the Onda V819 Mini astroturf posts is that there hasn’t been anything similar for the Atom-based Teclast P89 Mini, which has been available for just as long.

A forum post gripes about the visual mismatch between the render of the Ramos K1 tablet and the actual tablet [Google English].

LuftCo’s new tablet — another Galaxy Tab 8.0 clone along the lines of the Teamgee Super 8 — gets a big astroturf post [Google English].

At this point, I am now ignoring all Chinese iPad Mini clones except for two which have yet to make lots of press: The Ramos K1 and the Tomato T2.

However, anyone looking for a small tablet would be better served by getting a 2013 Nexus 7, Kindle Fire HDX 7- or 8.9-inch, LG G Pad 8.3, or the Dell Venue 7 or 8 Android tablets. The Dell tablets use the Intel Atom, killing the brief advantage the Teclast P89 Mini had.

And if having a 4:3 screen is a must, the upcoming HP Slate 8 Pro just kills all the Chinese clones with its Nvidia Tegra 4 CPU and 1600 x 1200 screen. Even if HP continues its record of stupidity and cripples it with just 1GB of RAM, I’d still have to recommend it over any Chinese iPad Mini clone. For a tablet with 2GBs of RAM, go for the Kindle Fire HDX 8.9 or the LG G Pad 8.3, both of which have screens nearly as wide as an iPad Mini.

It’s difficult for me to envision my interest in Chinese iPad Mini clones reviving even if — and it’s probably inevitable — they adopt the 1600 x 1200 screen of the HP Slate 8 Pro. The risk of buying from China, the lack of world-class quality control, and their propensity to cheat all mitigate such a revival. Even my desire for MultiWindow Android is not enough for me to go with a Chinese tablet.

The only tablet that might have any chance outside of China is the vapor-tablet from Xiaomi, which has dropped from everyone’s radar screen and probably won’t be released this year, if ever.

So, aside from a few more posts about Ramos K1 and the Tomato T2, this will generally end my coverage of Chinese iPad Mini clones.

Previously here:

Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #12
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #11
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #10
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #9
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #8
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #7
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #6
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #5
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #4
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #3
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #2
Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes #1

6 Comments

Filed under iPad Mini Clones

6 responses to “Chinese iPad Mini Clone Notes: Final Edition

  1. can’t wait until LG 8.3 becomes available

  2. E.T.

    According to this (http://www.androidauthority.com/lg-g-pad-korea-oct-14-280970) the G Pad will launch soon in Korea for the equivalent of $515.

  3. thank you for all the work you was doing covering chinese tablets

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